“If I am through learning, I am through.”—John Wooden

Face it, we are all so busy these days. Our to-do lists are long and it takes a lot of energy to be a leader, manager or collaborative contributor.  When I ask leaders and those I coach, many report that they have little time for career development or meaningful friendships. Some indicate that they don’t find their workplaces to be respectful and that it is hard to trust colleagues and there are few avenues for real feedback. Often people are competing for positions and it is hard to find the space to be real or vulnerable.

One exception that I have experienced is peer coaching groups where people make the commitment to support and challenge one another to create successful outcomes and to develop their skills. I have facilitated many of these groups as part of a larger corporate leadership program or as stand-alone coaching groups for leaders or those responsible for an area such as diversity, project leaders or senior executives.

I recently facilitated such a group for organization development and coaching professionals. We met virtually each month as well as with individuals in between. The experience was dynamic with significant results. Participants described it as “magical” and each were astounded at the progress made on their projects.

We began the process with the clear intention of supporting one another as well as each person working on a specific goal or project. As part of the norms, participants agreed to confidentiality, an open-mindset, vulnerability, focused participation, respectful listening and sharing and having fun. Each person identified a goal and received suggestions and feedback from the others. We had pair coaching as well as work as a whole group. In between the group meetings, people worked on their projects as well as connected with one or two other members.

We began subsequent meetings sharing progress and agreeing on next steps. The accountability with the group supported people in making substantial progress. The supportive environment inspired people to take action. For example, one member created a new program, developed a website and offered his course and gained clients. Others also embarked on cultural change projects and started significant new endeavors. Participants received just-in-time coaching and enhanced awareness and actions. Depending on the need, we provided models and tools that fostered learning and skill development. For example, I shared my OASIS process for positive and productive conversations.

What made the experience valuable was the oasis-like environment we created in the coaching group. We created an open environment for learning and we freely supported one another. There was not hidden competition where people were posturing. It is not easy to find such an environment of openness and genuine feedback. Participants felt seen by others in the group and made real friends that will last beyond the formal meetings. People were generous in introducing people to others who would be useful. Most importantly participants felt valued by peers and positive about their outcomes.

When we shared the experience with other professionals they said they yearned for the same sense of community and progress on their projects and goals.

Where are you getting support and coaching for your personal and professional development? I encourage you to join a coaching group or create this opportunity for yourself where you make progress on your goals amidst the support and feedback of colleagues.

Contact us any time at Potentials.

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